On Protest and Rebellion

I live downtown in one of the largest cities in America.

My wife and I have watched from our home some of the protests and arrests that have occurred following the killing of George Floyd.

I’ve also observed the initial sympathy expressed by my caucasian friends be replaced by anger when the looting and violence began. I’ve heard some pundits try to explain the looting and violence, and I’ve heard others even try to justify it.

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For White People Only: A Hypothetical on Race and the Church

What if:

  • America had been founded by black people from Africa;
  • Those black people captured white people from Europe and brought them to America to serve as slaves to black masters;
  • Black people continued to enslave white people for two hundred years;
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Jesus on Racism

The Jews in the first century were prejudiced against Samaritans.

The Samaritans were remnants of the Northern kingdom of Israel, which had established its capital in Samaria.

Judah, the Southern kingdom, had established its capital in Jerusalem

When the Assyrians invaded and carried away the Jews into captivity, those living in Samaria who remained intermarried with other non-Jewish people groups.

As a result, Samarians were not seen as pure Jews. Jewish prejudice was religious as well, rooted in a dispute over the proper place to worship God. See John 4: 20 (“Our ancestors worshiped on this mountain, but you Jews claim that the place where we must worship is in Jerusalem.”)

Consequently, Jews had nothing to do with Samaritans, as John noted. See John 4:9 (“For Jews do not associate with Samaritans”). It is also believed by many historians, that Jews would even walk around Samaria rather than through it when traveling north from Jerusalem.

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How Jesus Helped Me See Discrimination

Diversity HandsI am Caucasian.

Growing up Caucasian, I never experienced discrimination because of my race.

I was raised in a fairly conservative home, politically speaking, and by the time I was starting law school I believed race discrimination was a thing of the past in America.

By the end of my first year of law school I had joined the most diverse church I had ever known and made a lot of friends in the church who were not Caucasian.

The year was 1988, an election year, and because Jesse Jackson ran for president, race was part of the discussion during the election. Continue reading “How Jesus Helped Me See Discrimination”