On Truth And Justice

(c)iStockphoto/P_Wei

I sue large corporations for a living.

I’m an employment lawyer, and I represent individuals who have been discriminated against by their employers.

For the last 9 days I’ve been in California on two different cases. One is a sexual harassment case. I went to California to take the deposition of a witness who saw the manager of a fast food restaurant grab my 17 year-old client’s breasts.

The other attorneys had been mocking my client for nearly a year, telling me the incident never happened, that the witness never saw anything and was not to be believed.

We took the witness’s deposition in California. She was credible, she has no financial incentive in who wins the case and the company attorney had nothing to discredit her. I’ve been lied to for a year because the company is trying to avoid liability.

The other case is a wrongful termination case. My client worked for a company for five years, but within 6 weeks of getting sick and being hospitalized, the company terminated him. They deny having terminated him because of health reasons. The timing, they claim, is just a coincidence, even though they never threatened to terminate him before he got sick.

I’ve been practicing law for 20 years and I’ve never had a company admit to me they discriminated against one of my clients. There is a reason, but it’s not because I’ve never had a legitimate case. It’s that there is always plausible deniability for discrimination because discrimination is a motive.

Even in cases where I’ve had evidence that the decision-maker talked about getting rid of older employees, the company and it’s attorneys claimed the decision to terminate my client was not motivated by age.

The confluence of a financial motive to avoid lability and the ability to deny the unseen motive of the heart always results in a denial of liability.

We live in a world where people have motives to hide and obfuscate the truth, whether it be individuals attempting to hide their guilt and sin from God or corporations trying to avoid paying for their wrongdoing.

Revealing the truth leads to justice and repentance. It’s one of the reasons I love being an attorney, but it applies equally to dealing with individuals. When you speak the Word to people and when you expose injustice, you are doing the work of the King before whom “all things are open and laid bare…” (Hebrews 4:13). GS